Last edited by Shaktijar
Thursday, August 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of Chinook jargon as spoken by the Indians of the Pacific coast found in the catalog.

Chinook jargon as spoken by the Indians of the Pacific coast

C. M. Tate

Chinook jargon as spoken by the Indians of the Pacific coast

Chinook-English, English-Chinook.

by C. M. Tate

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  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Thos. R. Cusack in Victoria, B.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Chinook jargon -- Dictionaries -- English.,
  • English language -- Dictionaries -- Chinook jargon.

  • ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18545028M

    Pocket Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon: the Indian Trading Language of Alaska, the Northwest Territory and the Northern Pacific Coast (San Francisco: Downing & Clark, ) (multiple formats at ) PMS5: The Chinook Jargon and How to Use It (Seattle: Rainier Printing Company, ), by George C. Shaw (multiple formats at archive. Pocket dictionary of the Chinook jargon: the Indian trading language of Alaska, the Northwest Territory and the northern Pacific coast. San Francisco: Downing & Clark, Le Jeune, Jean-Marie Raphal. Chinook and shorthand rudiments: with which the Chinook jargon and the Wawa shorthand can be mastered without a teacher in a few hours.

    DICTIONARY OF THE CHINOOK JARGON, OR INDIAN TRADE LANGUAGE, OF THE NORTH PACIFIC COAST. VICTORIA, B. C. T. N. HIBBEN CO., Publishers. Government Street, Entered according to Act of Parliament of Canada, in the year , by.   Chinook Jargon is the most accessible of all the Native American languages. With a small utilitarian vocabulary and straightforward syntax, it was the lingua franca of the Northwest for most of the s. One hundred thousand Native Americans, settlers and immigrants were using it in Reviews: 2.

    Excerpt from Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon: English Chinook In connection with the compiling of this pocket Lexicon of the Chinook Jargon I am indebted to many of the Pioneers of the Northwest Territories of Canada and Kittitas County, Washington, for valuable assistance given, and thanks are especially due to Mr. George Gibbs. Testimony from in Astoria supporting the claim of Chinook Indian Tribe in - Chinook Tribe v. U.S. 3/ Treaties- Chinook. Indian Languages of Western Washington- Chinook Jargon and Salish Linguistics. Undated: 9/ McDonald- Fishing vessels and boats of the Pacific coast Undated: 15/ McDonald, J.- A review of.


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Chinook jargon as spoken by the Indians of the Pacific coast by C. M. Tate Download PDF EPUB FB2

Online Book Collections; Online Books by Topic; Biodiversity Heritage Library; Library Catalog (SIRIS) as spoken by the Indians of the Pacific Coast.

Chinook jargon, as spoken by the Indians of the Pacific Coast. Tate, C. Printed by Thos. Cusack, Victoria, B.C,c Chinook jargon, as spoken by the Indians of the Pacific Coast: for the use of missionaries, traders, tourists and others who have business intercourse with the Indians by Tate, C.

(Charles Montgomery)Pages: Chinook Jargon (Chinuk Wawa or Chinook Wawa, also known simply as Chinook or Jargon) is a nearly extinct American indigenous language originating as a pidgin trade language in the Pacific Northwest, and spreading during the 19th century from the lower Columbia River, first to other areas in modern Oregon and Washington, then British Columbia and parts of Alaska, Northern California, Language family: Mainly Wakashan (Nootka.

Dictionary of the Chinook jargon, or, Indian trade language of the North Pacific Coast. Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for [Shorey Book Store]. Chinook Jargon, pidgin, presently extinct, formerly used as a trade language in the Pacific Northwest region of North America.

It is thought to have originated among the Northwest Coast Indians, especially the Chinook and the Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka) peoples. The peoples of the Northwest Coast traded extensively among. On cover: Dictionary of Chinook jargon, Indian trade language of the Pacific Coast.

Contains advertising. Description: 35 pages ; 22 cm: Contents: pt. Chinook-English --pt. English-Chinook --The Lord's Prayer in jargon. Other Titles: Dictionary of Chinook jargon, Indian trade language of the Pacific Coast. Chinook Jargon, also called Tsinuk Wawa, pidgin, presently extinct, formerly used as a trade language in the Pacific Northwest region of North is thought to have originated among the Northwest Coast Indians, especially the Chinook and the Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka) peoples.

The peoples of the Northwest Coast traded extensively among themselves and with communities in the interior. Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon or Indian Trade Language of the North Pacific Coast by T.N. Hibben & Co. [Publisher]. Free audio book that you can download in mp3, iPod and iTunes format for your portable audio player.

Audio previews, convenient categories and excellent search functionality make your best source for free audio books. Jas. Cohen, Book and Job Printer, Victoria B. In issuing this revised Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon, the' object is to place in the hands of those who have business intercourse with the Indians of the Pacific coast, as well as to tourists and others, a means of making themselves understood by the natives where the Chinook is spoken.

Book/Printed Material Pocket dictionary of the Chinook jargon: the Indian trading language of Alaska, the Northwest Territory and the Northern Pacific Coast. Enlarge View 52 images in sequence.

Chinook Illahee - the Chinook-speaking region, or the land of the Chinook people (the lower Columbia) Help - help No, Wake, Halo - the three words used in Chinook for no, not, nothing, or for the negative Wake and halo are pronounced wah-kay and hah-lo.

On cover: Pocket dictionery [sic] of the Chinook jargon, the Indian trading language of Alaska, the Northwest Territory and the Northern Pacific Coast. Illustrated cover. Also available in digital form.

Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon, or Indian Trade Language, of the North Pacific Coast Language: English: LoC Class: PM: Language and Literatures: Indigenous American and Artificial Languages: Subject: Chinook jargon -- Glossaries, vocabularies, etc. Subject: Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America -- Languages Category.

PREFACE []. See Wiktionary:Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon/Preface. Part I. Chinook - English. [a []. ahha (Ah-ha), adv.

Common to various tribes. Yes. Expression of simple assent. On Puget Sound, E-ÉH. ahnkutte or ahnkottie (ah'n-kut-te or ahn-kot-tie), adv.

Chinook, ANKUTTI. Formerly; before now. With the accent prolonged on the first syllable, a long time ago. Ahnkutte lakit sun. Book from Project Gutenberg: Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon or Indian Trade Language of the North Pacific Coast. Chinook jargon was "a less than ideal fit" for the negotiations between the United States and the Natives of the Pacific Northwest because it a.

Had a limited vocabulary and the negotiations were far too delicate and specific. Was not spoken by American negotiators. Chinook jargon as spoken by the Indians of the Pacific coast [electronic resource]: for the use of missionaries, traders, tourists and others who have business intercourse with the Indians / ([Victoria, B.C.?: s.n.], ), by C.

Tate (page images at HathiTrust; US access only). Chinook is pronounced "chih-nook." This is an English pronunciation of the Salishan place name Tsinuk, which was also the name used for the Chinook Jargon trade language.

The Chinook Indians are original people of the Pacific Northwest Coast. They live in Washington state. The Chinooks live on a reservation, which is. Dictionary of the Chinook jargon or Indian trade language of the North Pacific coast [Francis Norbert Blanchet] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Dictionary of the Chinook jargon or Indian trade language of the North Pacific coast. This book, Dictionary of the Chinook jargon or Indian trade language of the North Pacific coast. This is an extract from George Gibb’s Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon, or, Trade Language of explored the intricacies of the northwest coast of America, picked up at their general rendezvous, Nootka Sound, various native words useful in Its advantage was soon perceived by the Indians, and the Jargon became to some extent a means of.

Pocket Dictionary Of The Chinook Jargon: The Indian Trading Language Of Alaska, The Northwest Territory And The Northern Pacific Coast Download Book (Respecting the intellectual property of others is utmost important to us, we make every effort to make sure we only link to legitimate sites, such as those sites owned by authors and publishers.along the coast at the river’s mouth.

It is here that Chinook families welcomed Lewis and Clark to the Pacific Ocean and helped them survive the winter of / The Chinookan people living along the Lower Co - lumbia River were traders long before Euro-Amer - icans invaded the Pacific Coast.

The Chinook Indians were original inhabitants of the lower Columbia River including the future Pacific County. There were more than 40 Chinook settlments in Pacific County, at the mouths of the Nemah, Naselle, Willapa, and Bone rivers, and at Nahcotta, Oysterville, Goose Point, Bruceport, Tokeland, and Grayland.